The College Work Load

For incoming freshman/first year students, college can sound very scary, but honestly, it really depends what one associates college with.

Before I left home, everyone told me that college will be some of the best years of my life, but all I could think about was that I would be spending hours upon hours doing homework, reading, and studying for tests, quizzes, and essays.books

However, I have now realized that I was scared for no reason…yes, I actually have homework, and yes mom, if you are reading this, I do study.

For me, I have been able to accomplish almost all of my homework, studying, and writing essays between 8AM and 6PM on weekdays; this works great for me because it feels like a full time job versus school. After 6PM (the majority of the time), I have my homework and studying done for the day which allows for plenty of time to nap, read, hang out with friends, and explore Daytona Beach.

Please know that the work load depends upon your major, teachers, and the classes you take, and as the semester ends, the work load can increase a lot. However, if one keeps up with everything, the workload is manageable.

Some tips for success:

  • Try not to get behind, but if you do, be sure that you communicate with your professor and work hard to catch up.
  • Don’t procrastinate!
  • Try to complete homework as soon as its assigned.
  • Don’t start studying for a test the night before.
  • Lastly, don’t stress too much! Make sure that you enjoy some downtime.

Overall, I have been pretty happy with the assignments I have had to do for my classes as I actually see how I will be able to apply what I learn in a future internship and job. In high school, I frequently would ask myself “when am I actually going to use this,” but now in college, I ask this question very rarely.

My professors have done an excellent job connecting the curriculum to the real world. For example, I remember asking myself if I will ever use Calculus after college, my professor explained and demonstrated how we can and will use Calculus to solve supply/demand situations.

Meanwhile, we had to create several graphs comparing two airlines based on several different measurements (number of flights, passengers, available seat miles, profit/loss, etc.). As soon as my professor started explaining the assignment, I immediately realized that I will be able apply this skill to my internship at Airways News this summer.

I guess it’s safe to say that I look forward to attending class–even though my day starts at 8AM everyday–since I see when I’ll actually be able to apply what I learn.

Until next time,

Jack

The Second Semester Begins!

Hello there!

It’s safe to say that my first semester at Embry-Riddle flew by as I cannot believe that it’s already the third week of the second semester!photo

I’m very happy to report that my first semester was a huge success on many different levels. I made a lot of new friends, interviewed for a few internships, finished the semester with terrific grades, joined two clubs on-campus (NBAA and Airport Management Club) and got very involved in the College of Business.

Winter Break

After finals, it was great to go back home to Houston, Texas for a few weeks for some R&R, to spend time with friends and family, and work a little. 9497_632518200207804_6688877303027923437_n 10646980_632517903541167_2664216326904276421_n

At the end of December, I traveled to Atlanta, Georgia to write about and attend the AirTran Airways farewell ceremony as I work as a journalist for AirwaysNews.com and Airways Magazine. Attending the farewell celebration is one of the most unique experiences and stories that I’ve gotten to report as a journalist. It reminded me why I am so passionate about airlines, and why I hope to join the industry soon.

What fascinates me the most is how thousands of people come together at an airline to get hundreds of thousands of people from point A to point B 24/7/365. As I flew to Atlanta the morning of the final flight, I began to wonder how many passengers AirTran has carried since starting out as ValuJet in 1993. Regardless of the number, we can certainly say they brought millions together for birthdays, weddings, family vacations, business meetings, holidays, and many other occasions. Thanks to AirTran and ValuJet employees, they helped make it possible.10670056_599294093530215_28090309397519307_n

My Second Semester Begins

Now, I’m in the middle of the third week of the Spring Semester, and I can already tell that it will be another great semester!

However, I do have a full load between Airline Management, Humanities: Introduction to Literature, Macroeconomics, Quantitative Methods II, Advanced Computer Based Systems, a part-time job in the College of Business, being a member of the College of Business Student Advisory Board, and exploring Daytona Beach as well as the Sunshine State.

Stay tuned as the adventure continues!

 

Summer Life – Delta Air Lines Internship

 

Delta World Headquarters

Hey all!  I hope everyone is having a great summer as we fly into the month of June.  My month of May was quite eventful; I wrapped up finals at the beginning of the month and then headed up to start my summer internship at Delta on May 12th.  I’m working with the great folks in the Network Planning department where a large group of individuals plan where and how we are going to fly all of the routes that are out for sale to the public.  The process isn’t as easy as saying you’re flying from point A to B at this time, it is a very choreographed process with tons of steps between deciding when and where to fly and how they are actually going to do it.

Sabre AirVision is the software that we use in Network Planning to schedule all of the flights that Delta operates.
Sabre AirVision is the software that we use in Network Planning to schedule all of the flights that Delta operates.

My internship started off very quickly as I quickly became acclimated with our scheduling software, Sabre AirVision.  The product is very easy to use and not only contains the flight schedule that we are working with, but it also generates reports on things such as flights that may have the same number as another (duplicates, which you cannot have on the same day) and hours that airplane types and crews will fly (we only have so many airplanes and pilots and crews are restricted by the FAA on how many hours they can fly in a day).  I cannot imagine scheduling flights without a product such as this one.

Network PlanningPutting together the schedule is quite a challenge because of dozens of things that the normal traveler doesn’t see.  Things such as performing overnight maintenance on our fleet and keeping the number of flights coming into and out of a hub within max limitations is a very hard task due to the number of flights that we are trying to fly in a day.  The Delta system is based around a hub-and-spoke style layout and every hub has special characteristics that the folks in Network Planning have to keep in mind.  No one flying on an airline likes delayed or cancelled flights and it is our job to make sure that every flight gets off the ground as planned, on-time through major planning months before the day of the flight.

Traveling while interning at Delta is a must!  I went to NYC for the first time over Memorial Day and it was a fantastic experience!

Traveling while interning at Delta is a must! I went to NYC for the first time over Memorial Day and it was a fantastic experience!

One great perk of interning at Delta is the flight benefit package.  A normal intern has the opportunity to non-rev, or fly anywhere in the world for minimal or no cost at all as long as there is an open seat in the cabin, aka a non-revenue generating seat and passenger for the airline.  So far I have worked at Delta for three weeks and have gone home to Indiana twice and to New York City, Myrtle Beach, and Daytona Beach all once.  Being an airline intern definitely has its perks other than gaining awesome experience behind the scenes.  I cannot wait to use my non-rev benefits to travel around the world!

6Delta World Headquarters, known as the G.O. by employees, is an awesome place to work and I am extremely honored to have been chosen to work for and represent such a well respected and successful entity.  Stay tuned for blogs in the coming weeks and months from here in Atlanta!

 

Happy flying,

Kyle

 

The Future of General Aviation

My 1955 Apache with my Dad’s 1950 Pacer. Airplanes like these are mainstays in the general aviation category.

Some of you might be wondering why I’m righting a blog about the future of general aviation because these blogs are supposed to be related to student life at Embry-Riddle.  But, what about life after Embry-Riddle?  I plan to stay in general aviation as a career and I am a huge general aviation proponent and believe it is a vital component to the transportation system around the globe.  It is a pure form of time travel, and when someone is lacking a bit of time and needs to get from Point A to Point B more efficiently, regularly, general aviation is a the go-to to provide that service.

The GA industry has sure evolved since its major inception just after the Second World War, and it is still evolving today.  Just like its big brother, the airline industry, competition across the GA market on the big scale has decreased, but it is still extremely strong today.  One reason it is so strong is because of the advent of growth in the experimental aircraft category, which continues to pave the way for new, feasible aviation technologies.  Parts being non-certified doesn’t always mean bad things, unlike their general connotations.  Non-certified parts are generally cheaper and of the same quality as their certified counterparts, and sometimes they’re identical to the same, more expensive piece!

Consumer electronics are another revolutionary in the aviation industry as well.  The onset of the true Electronic Flight Bag age is here, and that was all because of the iPad.  No longer are the days of purchasing new charts every 56 days, just click “download” in ForeFlight and updated charts are at your finger tips.  Cell phones are also being used for the same application, and that sector is only going to grow like the size of their new screens.  One other consumer electronic device has revitalized flying, and that is the GoPro.  Capturing everything aviation, the fish-eyed GoPro is making waves and bringing new people to the industry, young and old.  Inflight wifi is also the next big thing that is coming to light airplanes, and hopefully soon.  Costs are going down on that technology as developments are being made.  I really think that will spark new interest in the common man with new found connectivity while on the go.

With all of these positives, there has to be a negative, and that comes in the sense of rapidly growing costs.  No longer are the days of ads with $5000 airplanes, now $500,000 gets you a nice traveling machine.  Fuel costs and associated airport fees are also skyrocketing which is only driving down the activity in and around general aviation.

Back to when General Aviation was growing rapidly. Piper offered to teach you to fly for free if you bought your own Piper J3 Cub.

I wrote this because I truly care about general aviation.  I grew up around it and always aspired of owning a company in this industry sector because of all of the great things that come from it.  True innovation happens here, and the gift of flight is given to so many here as well.  I cannot wait to see what the future brings to general aviation!

Happy flying,

Kyle