Flying high over WA State

Over the past two weeks, I have been spending a lot of time in the air. Although I’m not a pilot, I will never skip a chance to go flying. One of the best experiences I’ve ever had flying happened just two weeks ago.

Because Alaska Airlines operates over half of the flights at Sea-Tac International Airport, the two businesses have a close relationship. I’m thankful for this because Alaska Airlines took all of the interns (Port of Seattle, Alaska Airlines, and Horizon Airlines) on a delivery flight! Most people in the aviation industry never have the chance to go on a delivery flight of an aircraft, so I am very grateful I had the opportunity to.

The day started off at Alaska Airlines Headquarters, right across the road from Sea-Tac. We got to see all around the corporate building, then we got on a bus to head over to the Boeing 737 factory in Renton, WA. Boeing doesn’t offer public tours of the Renton factory, so it was pretty awesome to get to see inside. Unfortunately, we weren’t allowed to take photos, so I don’t have any to share with you all. After the tour, we headed over to the Museum of Flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. It is one of the best flight museums in the country. My favorite part is the 787 Dreamliner and Air Force 1 that they have on display for people to walk through outside. Have any of you ever been inside a 787? They’re huge!

Hanging out at Alaska Airlines Headquarters

Hanging out at Alaska Airlines Headquarters

A quote I love at the Museum of Flight

A quote I love at the Museum of Flight

After we were all toured out, we got on the bus and headed over to the Boeing Delivery Center building at Boeing Field. From there, we were able to go out on the ramp and meet our ride for the next hour. It was a brand new Boeing 737-900ER. We were able to take pictures in front of the aircraft, in the engines, as well as inside of the landing gear! It was amazing to see all of the wiring that goes into just the landing gear.

New Alaska Airlines Boeing 737-900ER

New Alaska Airlines Boeing 737-900ER

The wiring for the landing gear!

The wiring for the landing gear!

Sitting in the engine

Sitting in the engine

Once we had taken all the pictures we could, we boarded the aircraft. Just like new cars, it had that “new airplane” smell. We were able to sit wherever we wanted and roam about the cabin. Our flight route was leaving from Boeing Field, flying over the Cascade Mountain Range, and then looping back to Paine Field in Everett, were there are more Boeing factories.

Port of Seattle interns on the flight

Port of Seattle interns on the flight

During the flight, we were able to ride jump seat and talk to the pilots. Boeing also gave out gift bags with goodies and a full meal. It was awesome! We even played trivia over the speaker inside the aircraft. It was such a long, aviation-filled day, but I will remember it for a lifetime. I hope everyone gets the chance to go on a delivery flight, because you truly get to appreciate all of the work that goes into creating a brand new aircraft.

Up in the flight deck

Up in the flight deck

Now I mentioned I’ve been doing a lot of flying lately. I also was able to go on a few GA flights over the past few weeks. The first, we just did a few loops around my town and over the lake where I live. It’s crazy how different things look from the air!

The second GA flight I went on was incredible. We took a 172 up to Seattle and did a scenic waterfront flight. Normally, if anyone wanted to go on a Seattle flight, it would cost hundreds of dollars per person. However, the beauty of knowing pilots is that you get that whole experience and more, for a lot less! We flew north over Tacoma, the Puget Sound, around and under the Bravo airspace at Sea-Tac, and up to Seattle. It was so pretty, especially because we went at sunset. Seattle is one of the most beautiful cities in the country, and its even better from the air! We couldn’t get enough in just one fly-by, so we looped around for about 30 minutes, taking pictures and admiring the city from above.

Seattle waterfront from above

Seattle waterfront from above

Just a few friends in a 172

Just a few friends in a 172

Seattle, Washington

Seattle, Washington

 

A few years ago, I never would’ve thought I would be where I am today. I mean a delivery flight?! That’s a dream come true. Then flying over Seattle with some of my best friends, I never would’ve guessed. When I get to reflect back on all of the amazing aviation experiences I have had, I feel so blessed to be attending ERAU, where I’m making my dreams come true one by one. It is incredible all of the opportunities Riddle has given me, just in my first year. I cannot wait for the aviation-filled years to come!

Until next time,

Lindsey

Blue Skies and Tailwinds

Hey Everyone!

Sorry It has been a while since my last blog, summer has really been keeping me busy!

Classes and Flying

Summer B classes are in full swing already! It’s crazy how fast classes over the summer go by! Summer time is one of the best times to take classes in my opinion. I love the opportunity to get classes done in about half the time. Also campus is pretty quiet and peaceful. Parking is no hassle at all and you don’t have as much of the pressure and stress from clubs and organizations.I also enjoy the smaller classroom sizes, it allows for a better overall learning environment!

The summertime is also a great time to get a lot of flight training done (if you aren’t getting weathered by the afternoon Florida thunderstorms) I have been busy flying almost every evening and I have gotten so much more done! My dad came to visit earlier in the summer and I even had the opportunity to take him up on one of my flights with my instructor! It was a cool moment to finally show one of my biggest supporters all that I have accomplished down here at Riddle so far.

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Took my dad up flying when he came to visit!

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One of the perks about going to Embry-Riddle, is having tons of friends that are pilots! A few friends and I rented a plane and flew up to Saint Simons Island, Georgia! This is a very popular destination among Riddle pilots because the flight is beautiful all the way up the coast and there is an excellent BBQ restaurant!!

 

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Flying up to KSSI in Georgia!

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There’s something about the satisfaction of flying to dinner that makes it so much more satisfying!

 

 

Summertime Fun

While I’m not in class or flying, I have spent the rest of my time hanging out with friends, traveling, and training for my upcoming races.

Like I said before, summer is a little bit more low key, which gives me more time to do things for myself! Just a few weeks ago my friend and I ran the River Racing Series 10k (6.2 miles!)  It was so much fun! We woke up super early and even got to watch the sunrise over the inter-coastal. The race was a big loop that ran alongside the water. It was such a beautiful morning and I even beat my goal time by almost 10 minutes! I have set a goal to complete the Honolulu Marathon  in December! Since I grew up in Hawaii I thought this would be the perfect first marathon. I have about 5 races lined up in the fall to train for the race including a 15K and half marathon.Wish me luck-this Florida heat is killer!

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Post 10K !

 

For Fourth of July weekend, I was invited to go down to Naples (where my boyfriend Kyle is from) and take a trip down to Key West on a yacht! We spent the long weekend, walking around Duval Street, snorkeling out on the reefs and watching fireworks from the pier! There’s so much fun stuff to do down here in Florida, and it was so neat to be able to go to the southern most point of the U.S!

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Fourth of July out on Sand Key Reef!

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Sand Key Lighthouse

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The reef was amazing! We saw all the different reef fish, a sea turtle, sting ray, and even a shark!

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Attempting to be patriotic right before we watched the fireworks over the pier!

 

Life down here at Embry-Riddle has been really fun and pretty busy lately. I can’t believe that I am entering my final year of college! It really does go by so quickly and it is so important to soak up all the different opportunities that come your way, whether it’s academically or socially!

Until Next Time;Blue Skies and Tailwinds!

-Kealey

 

Living and Learning Abroad

Brandenburger Tor

Brandenburger Tor

At this point, we were all a little lost. Humanities class for the day had involved a walking tour of Berlin that ended at Brandenburger Tor. None of us were sure how to get from there to the Embry-Riddle WorldWide campus, a few rooms in a building. The instructions the tour guide gave us weren’t much help, either, considering we had been in the city for less than a week. After several wrong transfers and too much walking around stations, we arrived at Electrical Engineering I…significantly late. Dr. Demirkiran, the professor for EE335, was flexible, understanding. We all went for lunch and then proceeded to spend approximately six hours in class, covering content until it was clear no more content would enter our brains. This was not how college worked on main campus, but I was not complaining. It was a lot more interesting this way.

In one day, we had learned about Berlin the city and some of its major landmarks and the U-bahn and S-bahn. We learned that the route from Kurfürstenstrasse passed through “the stripper district” (a la experience and the tour guide), so we should go to class via Nollendorfplatz instead. We learned some basic circuit-y goodness and that Dr. Demirkiran may have some of the best anecdotes in existence.

Summer abroad was definitely better than any regular semester, and I’m not just saying that because the classes are pass/fail (though that is certainly a plus). Studying abroad is a lot more than just cramming information into our occasionally receptive heads.

The humanities class, Memory and Memorialization, taught by Dr. Silverman, met every morning at various locations, primarily in Berlin but also, for the few days we were there, in Paris. The day of the walking tour, day two of the official start of classes, we met at Hakescher Markt, a slightly touristy hub of restaurants and stores near Museumsinsel (Museum Island).

Our guide, Tarek (in the white shirt) gives us a brief rundown of the history of Berlin.

Our guide, Tarek (in the white shirt) gives us a brief rundown of the history of Berlin.

With the focus on memory, the class involved a lot of museums, monuments, and memorials. We visited Topography of Terror, an open-air museum about WWII and Berlin. The interior part of the exhibition is housed in the old SS headquarters, and a portion of the Wall extends along the street adjacent to the exterior exhibit.

Topography of Terror

Topography of Terror

The Jewish Museum was an architectural marvel that discussed the culture and history of the Jews not only through its exhibits but also through its experiential and immersive design. The Stolpersteine, one of the most peculiar and interesting methods of memory we studied, involved small brass plaques integrated into the cobblestoned sidewalks in front of the last known residences of various victims of the Nazis. The Stolpersteine were placed around Berlin by an artist, not the government or some organization dedicated to remembering something.

The name was apt: Stumbling Stones. These plaques were scattered throughout Berlin.

Stolpersteine                                     The name was apt: Stumbling Stones. These plaques were scattered throughout Berlin.

By visiting so many museums and memorials and walking all around Berlin, we really immersed ourselves in the city. We thought about the city not through the lens of a tourist looking for the flashy, glitzy, and beautiful but as people who, for a short time, had to live and learn within a new culture.

Electrical Engineering I, in contrast to Humanities, met in a classroom every afternoon. We usually spent several hours a day covering content. However, Dr. Demirkiran always interspersed the material with anecdotes. When we arrived or stayed late enough for hunger to take over, he joined us on our quest for food among the variety of options (falafel, kebap, sushi) just off Nollendorfplatz station. Despite the limited amount of time available, Dr. Demirkiran successfully covered the entirety of the necessary material for EE335.

After class, Dr. Demirkiran sometimes took us to cool places around Berlin just for kicks. Perhaps one of the best parts of studying abroad is the more casual interaction with the professors. We got to know our professors as people outside of the classroom setting, which not only made approaching them with questions easier but also made the experience a lot more fun.

Two of my classmates (Michael and Franck) and I at Schloss Charlottenburg...trying to decipher Dr. Demirkiran's photo instructions.

Two of my classmates (Michael and Franck) and I at Schloss Charlottenburg…trying to decipher Dr. Demirkiran’s photo instructions.

Chloe Mora looking for animals in the Berlin Zoo.

Chloe Mora looking for animals in the Berlin Zoo.

Studying abroad is not the typical learning experience. The classes are structured differently. Humanities was an immersive learning experience, which was a lot of fun and a lot more meaningful than a few texts and some theoretical discussions. Electrical Engineering lasted for several hours, as opposed to many more one hour classes. I actually found the different helpful and more enjoyable; drawing connections between concepts was easier, and less time was wasted reviewing previous lectures.

Both classes assigned homework and had assessments, but they were few and void of busy work. Humanities had readings assigned to accompany the sites visited during the class and asked us to think critically of the places we visited and their impact on the process of remembering via questions posted on the discussion board and two papers. Electrical Engineering had homework every few days, practice problems that tested the concepts covered in the preceding lessons and that we handed in electronically. A final exam consisting of an in-class and take-home element assessed our comprehension of the course.

Studying abroad did involve actual studying. However, the class formats were quite different from the usual semester formats, interaction with professors was more relaxed, and learning involved a lot more than just academic content.

USA, USA, USA!

Independence Day weekend could not have been anymore perfect. Between a great 4th of July, and the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) playing in the World Cup Finals the next day, it was almost impossible not to be in the festive spirit!

My family and I were fortunate enough to have purchased tickets to the FIFA World Cup Final months ahead, not knowing that the USWNT would be playing! So when the U.S. won the semi-final game, we were ecstatic! I had always wanted to see the National Team play, however I didn’t think the opportunity would ever present itself. Luckily, it did!IMG_2419

So, Sunday July 5th, we started our 3 hour road trip up to Vancouver, British Columbia. I was happy to be going to Canada, since it’s where I was born, and I haven’t been back in awhile! We made it across the border and into my homeland at about noon. We then spent the next few hours walking around the stadium area and enjoying all the World Cup festivities. I felt bad for the Japanese Team, because it was pretty much a home game for the U.S., there were U.S. fans everywhere!

International Boundary between Canada and the U.S.A.

International Boundary between Canada and the U.S.A.

Outside BC Place with our free Cokes!

Outside BC Place with our free Coca-Colas!

Once we got inside the stadium, the excitement began to set in. I was really at the World Cup Finals!! Our seats were located behind one of the goals, and we were sitting near the rowdy folks. This group of people are called The Outlaws, and they travel all around supporting U.S. Soccer. It was a lot of fun to be surrounded by them at one of the most iconic women’s soccer events!

The view from our seats

The view from our seats

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Field level with my sister

Who wouldn’t take a selfie at the World Cup?

The American Outlaws

The American Outlaws

Of course, because it was a final game, and Japan is a good team, I thought the game was going to be close. However, within the first few minutes the U.S. was already up by three goals! It was almost like a miracle. The atmosphere was incredible after that. I would get chills every time the crowd would chant for the U.S.. It was so crazy to be in a different country, but the whole stadium was cheering for the U.S. What a day for U.S. women’s soccer!! At the end of the game, when the entire team ran onto the field as the crowd was going wild, it felt like a scene from a really good sports movie. The players grabbed American flags and started running around thanking and waving at the fans. It was incredible.

The mascot of the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada

The mascot of the FIFA Women’s World Cup Canada

We met Internet-famous @Soccergrlprobs at half-time!

We met Internet-famous @Soccergrlprobs at half-time!

The USWNT celebrating on stage after the game

The USWNT celebrating on stage after the game

I feel so blessed that I was able to attend the game. My dream of going to a World Cup was checked off, and in the best possible way. It is an experience I will remember for the rest of my life, and I’m so happy I got to be a part of such a wonderful day in the soccer world.

Until next time,

Lindsey

Plane Spotting at CYUL, TNCM, and KDAB

Looking at a plane in the air that just took off or is about to land is part of my daily life. Since I work at the airport, I see planes moving everyday. Even at the end of my first year  at Embry-Riddle I never got tired and I would still look in the sky to see what kind of aircraft it was. Last week, I decided to go plane spotting after work.

In 2012, Montreal-Trudeau International Airport (CYUL) inaugurated the Jacques-De-Lesseps Park for plane spotting activities, the only official observation park in Canada. The park faces 9,600 feet runway 06R/24L. The thing I like about Montreal is that we have a lot of international carriers so I can have a variety of aircraft in my pictures. I like the Air Canada A320, but sometimes it is great to see other airlines that we don’t see very often in North America like Royal Jordanian and SkyGreece Airlines.

I like to see people watch planes even though they have no clue what type of aircraft it is. The airport installed a sign where it shows all the types of aircraft that flies in and out of Montreal. It indicates the shape of the aircraft as well as the number of passengers it can sit.

Last year during the Christmas break my family and I went on vacation to St. Maarten. The island’s airport (TNCM) is best known for its low approaches over the shore and Maho Beach. There are a few restaurants surrounding the beach with a perfect view of the approach. Here are some of the pictures I took when I was there:

KLM Boeing 747-400 a few seconds before touchdown.

KLM Boeing 747-400 a few seconds before touchdown.

The 'Queen of the Skies' flew over a crowded beach!

The ‘Queen of the Skies’ flew over a crowded beach!

Wells Fargo Bank Gulfstream G550 over Maho Beach.

Wells Fargo Bank’s Gulfstream G550 over Maho Beach.

United Airlines Boeing 737-700 arriving from Newark.

United Airlines Boeing 737-700 arriving from Newark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Daytona Beach, we also have great locations to see what is going on the runways. I enjoy going on the terrace of the Aviation Maintenance Science Building and the Flight Operations Center. I highly recommend to the new incoming freshman to go check it out. We don’t have a lot of commercial flights there but we do have a lot of general aviation traffic!

All the pictures in this blog were taken with my iPhone. Yes, I know it is not the greatest camera but it did the work. Below are some of the pictures I took in Montreal:

Swiss Intl. Air Lines Airbus A330-300 heading to Zurich.

Swiss Intl. Air Lines Airbus A330-300 heading to Zurich.

Air France B777-200ER taking off from 24L. There are up to 8 daily flights between Montreal and paris.

Air France B777-200ER taking off from 24L. There are up to 8 daily flights between Montreal and Paris.

Delta Connection CRJ 700 operated by GoJet Airlines.

Delta Connection CRJ 700 operated by GoJet Airlines.

Air Transat Boeing 737-800 with new fuel efficient Split Scimitar Winglets.

Air Transat Boeing 737-800 with new fuel efficient Split Scimitar Winglets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I only have about two weeks left working at the airport but summer is not over yet. I have many things planned in the next weeks. In my next post, I will share my experience working in an aviation environment this summer.

Until next time!

Nicolas

 

Let Freedom Ring: Independence Day Weekend Activities

Although I have been working non-stop this summer, I did take a break last weekend to enjoy myself. I was fortunate to have a Friday off, so I decided to take a road trip to the Nike Employee Store in Beaverton, Oregon. A few friends and I piled into a car and started our journey bright and early. We shared many laughs along the way and made it to Portland in what felt like no time at all!

I have a travel philosophy, which is that while you’re traveling, you should never eat at a restaurant that you could eat at while at home. So, of course, we looked up some of the best local restaurants in Portland. We ended up stumbling upon a small BBQ restaurant, which made some of the best pulled pork I’ve ever had.

After our appetites were satisfied, it was time to do some major shopping. I had been to the Nike Employee Store once before, however, never as an official Nike employee. The rule is you can only get into the store if you have a pass from a Nike employee. The exclusivity, in my opinion, makes it more exciting when you get the chance to shop there. The best thing about the Employee Store is that almost everything is 50% off. The bad thing about this is that you can do some major damage to your bank account in a short time, while still believing you’re saving money.

Once we had shopped for about an hour and we had grabbed all the Nike product we could, we journeyed back home. Not only was it a great shopping experience, it was awesome to spend some quality time with friends and family on the road!

The next day, July 4th, is one of my favorite holidays of the year (even though I’m Canadian)! I love all of the parties, fireworks, and pride that Independence Day brings. Where I live, we spend the 4th of July by the lake. This year was the perfect weather for a good BBQ and fireworks show. Because we didn’t get to light off any fireworks this year, at the end of the night, my friends and I went out to the lake to watch other people’s fireworks displays. Almost every house on the lake was lighting off their own fireworks, along with the professional show put on by my neighborhood. The night of July 4th is always one of the highlights of my summer, just because of the happiness and pride it brings to everyone.

The beginning of my Independence Day weekend was one for the books, however July 5, 2015 was a day I will remember for the rest of my life. Find out why in my next blog post!

Until next time,

Lindsey

Rebuilding of a City

It’s been a couple of weeks since the last time I posted a blog. Traveling around New Zealand made connecting to the outside world known as “internet” very difficult. This time my girlfriend and I travelled south of Auckland to a place call Christchurch. Christchurch is located in the southern island of New Zealand. It is the third largest city in New Zealand with Auckland being first, Wellington being second, and finally Christchurch. Christchurch has a population of 366,100; according to UNData. In 2011, a massive earthquake destroyed the city. Many businesses, homes, and schools were obliterated. Thankfully, the casualty were not severe.

Located in the heart of the city, there is a cathedral. Below is a photograph that I took off the internet to show you how magnificent the cathedral was before the Christchurch earthquake in 2011.

Christchurch Cathedral

Christchurch Cathedral

 

The next photograph is the picture that I took while I was in Christchurch.

Christchurch after the earthquake.

Christchurch after the earthquake.

There are not a lot of attractions in Christchurch due to the closure of many businesses. However, there are still a few things to do in Christchurch. So let’s get to it.

First thing to do when when you go to Christchurch is that you really have to visit the Cathedral Square. Located in the heart of the city as I mentioned earlier, the church is surrounded by parks where you can easily relax and have a picnic. Additionally, there are numerous amount of restaurant and cafe nearby. My girlfriend and I were looking for a place to have a quick lunch and lucky enough we stumbled upon this authentic Japanese ramen place. I must say, the food is phenomenal. The broth from the ramen itself is bursting with flavors. Below are some pictures that I took of the food before we ate.

Pork ramen.

Pork ramen.

 

 

Beef Danbury.

Beef Donbury.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next thing we did was, we went to to walk around the Avon river. At first, I thought it was going to be a big river perhaps big enough to transports goods in and out of the city, like the Nile River in Egypt or the Yangtze River in China, but it turns out the river was very small and and narrow but very beautiful. Below is the photograph that I took while I was standing on one part of the Avon River.

Avon River

Avon River.

For a fee of $25NZD you can take a gondola through the river. The advantage of taking the gondola as opposed to walking is that you are saving a lot of energy and time. The river takes you around the city. You can see many buildings such as the city council building and many others.

City Council of Christchurch

City Council of Christchurch.

Alternatively, you can always take the tram. Although the tram is a little bit more pricy, costing $40 NZD per person, you get to have a light lunch that is provided for you for free of charge. I wouldn’t really recommend this method because there are plenty of restaurants and cafes.

Tramway.

Tramway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In conclusion, Christchurch is a unique city with many history and a future that needs to be written. The whole city is currently on a rebuilding stage. There are not many things to do in Christchurch but it is definitely a city to visit when you go to New Zealand. Hopefully in the near future the city would be built stronger and much more modern.

 

 

Why Take Classes Abroad When You Can Take Them On Campus?

(why take classes on campus when you can take them abroad???)

I remember going into college wanting really badly to study abroad and being fairly certain it wouldn’t happen. I’m an engineering major; everyone said it was impossible/unwise/expensive/impossible.

Well, darling, I can tell you for sure it’s possible. I did it.

I woke up one morning and said to myself, I want to do the EE summer study abroad, walked into the Study Abroad office, and by afternoon, had started my application. A touch of spontaneity never hurt anybody.

So why did I (and why should you) do a summer study abroad? Here are five reasons from before and after my experience.

  1. It fit neatly into my plan.

Okay, so that spontaneity was…modified spontaneity. I had been eyeing the summer study abroad featuring electrical engineering for a few months. It fit nicely in my plan of required courses and helped me complete my EE and humanities requirements. Plus, being a summer semester meant it would take some of the load off of my regular (fairly packed) semesters on campus.

  1. The classes have a different learning format.

Class is still class. However, both EE and humanities were configured differently from a class in a regular semester on campus. Humanities met all around Berlin, meaning the classroom was the city. Classes consisted of tours of the city and its memorial sites and discussions of the sites and the assigned readings. EE met in a classroom in the Berlin WorldWide campus. Since there were fewer classes than even a summer semester on campus, class often ran for several hours. However, content was interspersed with breaks. I, for one, preferred having large chunks of information at once over a shorter semester; it helped when trying to connect and retain concepts. In both classes, assignments were designed with the “abroad” nature of the course in mind: they did not serve as “busy work” but as a means for the students to demonstrate their understanding of the concepts in the course.

  1. The class size is small(er than usual).

That means you get to bond with your classmates and professors and learn loads more about them. Which is fun. It also means the professor can take the time to explain a concept more carefully if a student is struggling to grasp it. Which is super helpful.

 

  1. You actually will expand your perspective.

I’m sorry. I know. The ultimate cliché. But it’s true. Whether that’s learning to use public transport (not applicable to me personally), about different infrastructure systems (the intercity trains in Germany are pretty awesome), to say right, left, train, airport, and bye in a new language (recht, links, zug, flughafen, tschüss), or about local food favorites (kebaps, kebaps, kebaps). Those seem like small details, but truly, seeing different cultures creates a broader understanding of the many different approaches people have to life, which is a valuable understanding you will not gain in the classroom (or in Daytona Beach…because you’ve kind of already seen it and it’s still the States).

  1. YOU’RE ABROAD.

After class, you have a whole, exciting, unknown city to explore, which we all know is infinitely more exciting than endless heaps of homework and Daytona Beach (sorry, DB, but Berlin is way cooler).

Airport Internship: End of Month

We are already more than halfway through the month of June and I feel it goes by so fast. Here is a recap of the last couple weeks I worked at the airport.

At the beginning of June, we started receiving the passenger statistics from the airlines for the month of May. The file the companies give us usually contain: the date, flight number, origin and destination, passengers deplaned and passengers emplaned, aircraft type, and seats available. Some airlines include revenue passengers as well as non revenue passengers. Non Revenue passengers are usually babies that are two years old and under and crew that are travelling. What I do is that I take all the passenger totals from each airline and I combine them in an Access and Excel database.

I also do the same thing I mentionned above but with cargo. It includes the inbound and outbound cargo. We enter the cargo in kilograms but the american carriers calculates their cargo in pounds so we have to convert it.

First Air B737-400 Combi getting ready for its flight to Kuujjuaq. The aircraft can carry 4 cargo pallets and 72 passengers.

First Air B737-400 Combi getting ready for its flight to Kuujjuaq. The aircraft can carry 4 cargo pallets and 72 passengers.

A few weeks ago, I met with the airport’s Schedule Facilitator. A part of his job consists of assigning the gates to the aircraft. He showed me the screen with all the gates assignments for a typical day. It looks like a big puzzle with different colors. It is not that easy to assign a gate to an aircraft. The turnaround of the aircraft and the size of the plane must be taken into account. For example, Delta’s Boeing 717 is usually parked for the night at gate C72,  because of its larger wingspan, while the other of Delta’s regional jets use gate C86 to C89 which are a bit further down the concourse.

United Express RJs getting ready to depart for their early morning flights.

 

Aeroméxico B738 featuring the new Split Scimitar Winglets. The aircraft is pushing back for its daily flight to Mexico City.

Aeroméxico B738 featuring the new Split Scimitar Winglets. The aircraft is pushing back for its daily flight to Mexico City.

I also got to take a look at the new international concourse extension. The airport is adding six new international jet bridges to accomodate growth. Air China recently announced that it would begin flying from Beijing (PEK) to Montreal three times a week starting late September. Air China will be the first carrier operating scheduled flights from Montreal to the capital of China. New carriers added service to Montreal in the couple past few years, such as Copa Airlines to Panama City, Turkish Airlines to Istanbul, and Qatar Airways to Doha.

This is an idea how the terminal will look like in about a year.

This is an idea of how the terminal will look like in about a year.

Extension of 6 new gates from the current International Concourse.

Extension of 6 new gates from the current International Concourse.

Everyday I spend working at the airport, I learn something new. I love that I am able to work in an environment I am studying in!

Until next time!

Nicolas

An Aviation Summer

These past few weeks have been nothing but busy. Between my internship at the Port of Seattle, working evenings and weekends at Nike, sleep, and trying to have a social life, I have become exhausted!

Since work consumes most of my summer, I’ll update you on how it is going. This past week at the Port of Seattle I have had the opportunity to do some pretty awesome things! The center runway at Sea-Tac (16C/34C) is being replaced this summer. One day we took a bus out on the airfield to observe the construction. It amazed me how deep the concrete has to be to support all of the stress that is put on a runway. It’s about 4 feet thick of concrete! After the tour, we stopped and got out of the bus to watch planes land and take off. We ended up watching for about 10 minutes. It’s amazing to be standing only 10 feet from a runway on which a A330 is taking off!

Southwest ready to take off on 16L

Southwest ready to take off on 16L

View from the Penthouse of the Airport Office Building. Looking over the South Satellite and a Delta A330.

View from the Penthouse of the Airport Office Building. Looking over the South Satellite and a Delta A330.

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Alaska Airlines ready to take off on 16L

 

China Airlines Cargo 747 being loaded with cherries to take to China

China Airlines Cargo 747 being loaded with cherries to take to China

Later this week we were able to go tour the FAA Air Traffic Control Tower at Sea-Tac. The experience was one that not many people get to have, since the towers are highly secured. From the tower we could see downtown Seattle, Mt. Rainier, and the Olympic Mountains. We also got to walk on the balcony outside of the tower to take some pictures of aircraft and the airport. It was interesting to watch Air Traffic Controllers in action, instead of just hearing them over the radios.

Southbound view of Sea-Tac from the ATCT

Southbound view of Sea-Tac from the ATCT

My other job, at Nike, is a part-time seasonal job that I picked up for the summer. I have enjoyed working there more than I ever thought I would. The atmosphere and the people at Nike are amazing. I have had the chance to work in all different sections of the store, however Women’s and Kid’s Apparel is my favorite section. The only negative to working at Nike is that most of my paycheck goes back to the company, because I buy Nike shoes and apparel all the time now!!!

When I’m not at work, I try to do something that I haven’t done before. One day David and I took a trip up to Paine Field to go to the Boeing Factory Tour. It was incredible to see how big the building is!! I loved getting to see 777’s, 787’s, and 767’s being built and painted.

Standing at Paine Field with the Boeing Factory and flight line in the background.

Standing at Paine Field with the Boeing Factory and flight line in the background.

I am so happy that I have the opportunity to fill my summer with aviation. At the start of my freshman year at Riddle, I never would’ve imagined myself working at an airport, let alone the fastest growing airport in North America! It has been truly a blessing and I am looking forward to what else this summer will bring!

Until next time,

Lindsey